3 Questions, 4 Business Tips: Don’t Let Your Business Get Left Behind

 

Do you remember as a child being reminded about how important it was to do your homework and to get good grades so that you wouldn’t be left behind while your classmates graduated to the next grade or subject level?

How about when you were a child your parents always reminded you to stay by their side when out shopping so you wouldn’t get lost or left behind?

Or while growing up you probably wanted to wear the latest clothes that others at school wore or you listened to the Top 40 hits each week on the radio so you knew what music was at the top of the charts. You didn’t want to seem like you were behind with the times.

The same is true in business. Especially in today’s fast moving business environment. It doesn’t take much time at all before you can get left behind or appear as though you are behind with the times.

 

I am not saying to stop everything you are doing. What I am saying, if you are a CEO, president or business owner, is to think about these three questions:

1) How can you improve upon what you already are doing successfully in your business?

2) What isn’t as successful in your business and how can you make it better?

3) What do you need to do that you haven’t done in your business?

 

Dick Clark of American Bandstand fame passed away this week. Dick Clark’s career spanned more than 50 years. Very few business people accomplish such successful longevity. The secret to his success was, as I heard on the cable news shows and read in USA Today, being able to reinvent himself and at the same time, have the vision to sense what the audiences wanted at a particular time. He reinvented himself through the decades. Always stayed current.

He worked in the mailroom of his father’s radio station. Started out as a country music disc jockey known as, “Cactus Dick and the Santa Fe Riders” in Utica, NY. Then he got his lucky break and found himself hosting a television show in Philadelphia which became legendary in the music industry and in our lives, American Banstand. Barry Manilow wrote the lyrics to the famous theme music. At age 27 he formed Dick Clark Productions and produced American Bandstand for 26 years. Both the show and Dick Clark were cultural and industry pioneers.

Dick Clark went on to do much more than just American Bandstand. Including acting as host of the classic game show, $25,000 Pyramid, co-host with Ed McMahon TV’s Bloopers & Practical Jokes, created the American Music Awards (to rival the Grammys), produced other award shows including the Golden Globes, and was Mr. New Year’s Eve for years. He worked, not just with the biggest music stars, but more importantly with the technology of the day to create success and profit – and to give us all great music and memories.

In a Today Show feature, it mentioned that Dick Clark considered his greatest asset was being able to “keep his finger on the pulse…”

 

In your business, you need to do the same. Consider these four business tips:

– Keep your finger on the pulse so your business doesn’t get left behind.

Reinvent your business in both small and large ways.

– Always be looking for how you can do business better.

– Have a never-give-up attitude.

 

When Apple’s Steve Jobs passed away numerous articles were written about the business lessons learned from Steve Jobs. The same can be true of Dick Clark. He was an entertainer, an American, a visionary, an entrepreneur, a salesman, and most of all, a businessman.